estudio cabana: BRAP: Flip Dot and the Dialectics of Conceit

    estudiocabana:

    The parking lane along Progress Ave. was quite wide enough to congregate local Hip-Hop artists of Filipino descent from different parts of Toronto. Dance crews walked it out with beats by the DJ. Graphic t-shirts stood along the walls of the garage that was bombed with stickers nascent of…

    • 1 year ago
    • 2

    That’s Racist! (but not how you might think)

    Image

    Another Halloween is past and you know what that means my POC friends.  Yup, we just did another round of muttering “that’s racist” over and over again to ourselves.

    … and while I fear I might be (ok, am) a minority on this one (see what I did there?):  I don’t entirely get it.

    Now ruling out the extremely obviously racist costumes like the buck toothed Asian (a la Mickey Rooney in Breakfast at Tiffany’s), Jim Crow era Black caricatures, or Islamic “terrorists,” which clearly are unacceptable, I don’t particularly agree with the uproar and activism over “ethnic” costumes.

    When I say I don’t ‘get it.’  I mean that I don’t accept the rationale behind why the outcry is focused on the costumes themselves.  I don’t understand why the call is basically for White people NOT to do it.  Full Stop.

    I mean why is it that we see costumes based on traditional dress racist?  The usual refrain is:  “we are a culture, not a costume.”  But if this is the case, would it not also be proper for Whites to decry costumes based on horned Vikings (which are historically inaccurate btw) or medieval knights?

    Now the answer to my question is obvious: It’s not the same because of the disparity in power relations, and the vicious history of colonization that has imbued on to these images a different connotation.

    I get that.

    What I don’t get, is why this translates simply into:  Don’t wear that Whitey! 

    (Click HERE to continue reading…) 

    • 1 year ago

    Sometimes “Illegal” Doesn’t Mean “Unjust”

    anakbayan-toronto:

    The Cybercrime bill is justifiably getting a lot of attention these days.  Even those not normally politicized recognize that a law that makes even FB “sharing” of post critical of the government punishable by imprisonment is a tad bit harsh.

    “If you click ‘like,’ you can be sued, and if you share, you can also be sued,” said Sen. Teofisto Guingona III, one of the lawmakers who voted against the passage of the law.

    The provision, according to Guingona, is so broad and vague that it’s not even clear who should be liable for a given statement online. And if you’re found guilty, get ready to spend up to 12 years in prison.  *from: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-202_162-57522609/facebooks-like-may-land-filipinos-in-jail/

    This is legal.

    This is no infraction of the law.  This is no misreading of the law.  This is no mistake.

    This is legal.

    Many people seem to recognize this.  This is quite refreshing because it pokes through a “unknown known” we all have.  That group of things we all know but often either don’t realize we know, or we forget that we know.  Specifically that ‘legal’ doesn’t necessarily mean ‘just.’

    Read More

    • 2 years ago
    • 5
    Operation Lifeboat:Even though the live event is over, the issues raised remain a problem, and so the fundraising drive continues…Please consider donating to Sagip Migrante’s disaster relief efforts in the Philippines: http://www.sulongtheatre.com/how-to-donate.htmlWatch videos from the live event: http://www.sulon
gtheatre.com/watch-the-live-stream.html 



Join us on Wed 3 Oct 2012 for a discussion on the topics raised:  https://www.facebook.com/events/368981279843033/

    Operation Lifeboat:

    Even though the live event is over, the issues raised remain a problem, and so the fundraising drive continues…

    Please consider donating to Sagip Migrante’s disaster relief efforts in the Philippines: http://www.sulongtheatre.com/how-to-donate.html


    Watch videos from the live event: http://www.sulon

    gtheatre.com/watch-the-live-stream.html 

    Join us on Wed 3 Oct 2012 for a discussion on the topics raised:  https://www.facebook.com/events/368981279843033/
    • 2 years ago
    • 6

    anakbayan-toronto:

    WE ARE LIVE NOW!  Join us in person or online.  We live stream at the top of every hour.

    Donate to Sagip Migrate: http://www.sulongtheatre.com/how-to-donate.html

    Online:  http://www.sulongtheatre.com/watch-the-live-stream.html

    TIME AND DATE: 8pm Sept 21st to 8pm Sept 22 2012
    LOCATION: Cahoots Theatre Company Studio 388 Queen Street East, Unit 3, Toronto, Ontario M5A 1T3
    MORE INFO: 416.707.6111

    *24 hrs of reflection*

    A Fundraiser. A Demonstration. An Artistic Statement. An Act of Global Solidarity.

    http://www.sulongtheatre.com/watch-the-live-stream.html

    In response to the recurring flooding in the Philippines, the Filipino artistic community wanted to raise money and awareness that there was nothing ‘natural’ about these disasters. But they knew they would have to go to drastic measures to get the point across. 

    OPERATION LIFEBOAT: On 8pm Sept 21st, Artistic Director of Sulong Theatre Company in partnership with Anakbayan-Toronto, Catherine Hern

    andez will be lying in a lifeboat filled to her chin in dirty water for a total of 24 hours. She will have no access to food and her only luxury will be to have access to clean water to drink at timed intervals and health professionals at the ready for her own health and safety. Through twitter, youtube and facebook feeds throughout the world, she will be watched as she observes a day-long demonstration/performance art installation to raise awareness and funds for the recurring flooding in the Philippines. 
    • 2 years ago
    • 2

    Our paypal donation button is up and running. Press it like you mean it and give big.  http://www.sulongtheatre.com/how-to-donate.html

    anakbayan-toronto
    :

    *24 HOURS OF REFLECTION*

    A Fundraiser. A Demonstration. An Artistic Statement. An Act of Global Solidarity.

    Friday September 21st to Saturday 22nd September.  8pm to 8pm.  Join us in person (at 388 Queen St. E.) or online (at www.sulongtheatre.com).

    Anakbayan-Toronto is proud to be working with Catherine Hernandez and Sulong Theatre to raise awareness and raise funds about the unnatural disasters that seem to regularly be affecting the Philippines these days.

    In response to the recurring flooding in the Philippines, the Filipino artistic community wanted to raise money and awareness that there was nothing ‘natural’ about these disasters. But they knew they would have to go to drastic measures to get the point across. 

    OPERATION LIFEBOAT: On 8pm Sept 21st, Artistic Director of Sulong Theatre Company in partnership with Anakbayan-Toronto, Catherine Hernandez will be lying in a lifeboat filled to her chin in dirty water for a total of 24 hours. She will have no access to food and her only luxury will be to have access to clean water to drink at timed intervals and health professionals at the ready for her own health and safety. Through twitter, youtube and facebook feeds throughout the world, she will be watched as she observes a day-long demonstration/performance art installation to raise awareness and funds for the recurring flooding in the Philippines. 

    Funds raised will go to Sagip Migrante.  

    This relief drive (winner of a 2012 Bayaning Pilipino Global award) is run by Migrante International, the largest advocacy organization for Filipino migrants, it works not just to provide relief to survivors, but works to change the systemic conditions that led to the floods in the first place.

    If you are interested in performing, volunteering, or hosting this event on your website please get in touch.  More info on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OperationLifeboat2012

    MEDIA ENQUIRIES, INTERVIEW COORDINATION AND IMAGES:
    Alex Felipe, Anakbayan-Toronto
    anakbayan.toronto@gmail.com
    416.707.6111

    • 2 years ago
    • 2

    Sulong Theatre and Anakbayan-Toronto (parent org to Kamalayan) present…

    In response to the recurring flooding in the Philippines, the Filipino artistic community wanted to raise money and awareness that there was nothing ‘natural’ about these disasters. But they knew they would have to go to drastic measures to get the point across. 

    OPERATION LIFEBOAT: On 8pm Sept 21st, Artistic Director of Sulong Theatre Company in partnership with Anakbayan-Toronto, Catherine Hern
    andez will be lying in a lifeboat filled to her chin in dirty water for a total of 24 hours. She will have no access to food and her only luxury will be to have access to clean water to drink at timed intervals and health professionals at the ready for her own health and safety. Through twitter, youtube and facebook feeds throughout the world, she will be watched as she observes a day-long demonstration/performance art installation to raise awareness and funds for the recurring flooding in the Philippines. 

    Her inspiration? The photo in the poster of this unknown child in Manila desperately floating amongst debris following the flooding. 

    "My aim is to be in solidarity with this young child whose struggle through filthy waters needs to be known internationally, as well as to raise funds for the survivors of the Manila floods this year," says Catherine. "I know that the culprits to this supposed natural disaster are political and economic. Every year we see that beyond the clear problems of climate change there is also the fact that government of the Philippines is more concerned with lining the pockets of a select few at the expense of the many, and for the benefit of people like us in the West. And it is a sad fact that the beneficiaries of this suffering include us in Canada." 

    Surrounding the ever-present Catherine Hernandez as she observes her day-long journey, the demonstration cum art installation will include a whopping 24 artists from various cultural backgrounds who will begin each hour of the protest with a performance to show their solidarity. 

    The event, named Operation Lifeboat, will begin and end with a candlelight vigil with numerous ways in which public spectators can drop in throughout the 24 hour event to learn more about the issues surrounding the recurring flooding, send messages of hope, and of course, donate. 

    Operation Lifeboat aims to be an online event in which people throughout the world can watch Catherine’s progress. 

    For twitter, simply follow @sulongtheatre or #operationlifeboat
    Facebookers can like our event page here.
    For more information, go to www.sulongtheatre.com

    OPERATION LIFEBOAT
    Fundraiser Performance/Demonstration/
    Produced by Sulong Theatre Company in Partnership with Anakbayan-Toronto

    TIME AND DATE: 8pm Sept 21st to 8pm Sept 22 2012
    LOCATION: Cahoots Theatre Company Studio 388 Queen Street East, Unit 3, Toronto, Ontario M5A 1T3
    MORE INFO: 416.707.6111

    MEDIA ENQUIRIES, INTERVIEW COORDINATION AND IMAGES:
    Alex Felipe, Anakbayan-Toronto
    anakbayan.toronto@gmail.com
    416.707.6111
    • 2 years ago
    • 6

    anakbayan-toronto:

    A documentary shot in a guerrilla base in Davao City, featuring red fighters of the New People’s Army’s Merardo Arce Command. An interview with NPA Political Director Simon Santiago, and glimpses of ordinary guerrilla life, show the current state of people’s war in the region. www.pinoyweekly.org

    • 2 years ago
    • 3

    Let Me Help You Save $$$ - Hire a Filipino!

    Outsourcing isn’t new. It’s happened for time immemorial, whenever national economies needed a job done cheap, or a dirty job done well. Heck, the Spanish used soldiers from one end of the Philippines to repress rebellions in another region.

    So what are the repercussions of our modern-day outsourcing? This article, for example, makes no pretenses about its rationale - it cuts business costs. And this is only one of hundreds or perhaps thousands of DIY entrepreneurial  how-tos on the internet.

    Another article by the same author defends her use of offshore Filipino labour. Perhaps she has a point. After all, the wages paid to her Filipino employees, which would be considered criminal over here, are relative fortunes over there. 

    But does the analysis have to stop there? What does this say about the state of a nation which pimps its citizens out to the rest of the world? The marketing jobs offered by this author are plush in contrast to Overseas Filipino Workers who, because of a lack of developed national industries, must toil for foreign masters. Why can’t the Filipino operate his or her own business and thrive in the country of his or her birth? 

    Furthermore, what does this say about the global economic system - a place of Haves and Have Nots, where economic and political decisions are made for the benefit of — I’ll let you finish the sentence.

    • 2 years ago
    • 1

    High Time for Filipino Animation?

    Pixar co-founder Ralph Guggenheim is in the Philippines for a film, animation, and gaming convention and had this to say about the potential for the Philippine creative industry:

    "We see the Philippines as one that is under realized so far in the world and that there is a great deal of animation work and gaming work that can be made in the Philippines that can be sent back to the world." 

    So you tell us - Why hasn’t the Philippine animation industry enjoyed the same level of development and success as its counterparts in the USA, Japan, France, and South Korea?

    • 2 years ago
    • 5

    anakbayan-toronto:

    Sunday, July 22 – Toronto

    The intersection of Bathurst Street and Wilson Avenue is ordinarily a bustling corner of north Toronto, an energetic but otherwise unassuming slice of real estate that many Filipino immigrants have claimed as their own. On Sunday, July 22, however, shouts of “Makibaka, Huwag Matakot!” could be heard reverberating off the local karinderya walls, as a coalition of progressive-minded Filipinos rallied at the Bathurst-Wilson Parkette in opposition to Philippine President Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino’s State of the Nation Address.

    Members of the progressive Filipino-Canadian organizations Bayan Canada, Migrante Canada, Filipino Migrant Workers Movement, Gabriela Ontario, and Anakbayan Toronto lined the curbside from mid-afternoon until the evening to air their grievances with President Aquino’s SONA speech, which was to be broadcast in the Philippines on July 23. With their organizations’ flags dancing back and forth across the humid summer currents, dozens of demonstrators, many clad in red, took turns on a megaphone, deflating many of the Aquino administration’s alleged victories. Giant placards strewn with the statistical wreckage of the Philippine government’s track record on human rights and economic prosperity jutted out into the street, attracting Sunday passersby queuing for space at the bus stop.

    The State of the Nation Address is given once a year by the President of the Philippines. Part year-in-review, part look forward, it is traditionally used as a political vehicle to remind the public of the current administration’s achievements along with its promises for the future well-being of the Philippines. The organizers of Sunday’s rally predict a cloudy forecast for the country’s 95 million people.

    “We must reveal the true purpose of SONA to the many Filipinos who are suffering back home. This is a State of the Nation for the wealthy from their president,” commented Jay Jay Carpio of Filipino Migrant Workers Movement.

    The rally was led by Rhea Gamana of Anakbayan Toronto, a progressive youth organization under the umbrella of Bayan Canada. Gamana’s thunderous voice betrayed her petite frame. The megaphone easily carried her voice to the four corners of the intersection, where even docile customers at the local watering hole inched closer to get an earful. Fellow demonstrators dutifully distributed a leaflet detailing the plight of the Filipino people both in the Philippines and abroad in Canada.

    Petronila Cleto of Gabriela Ontario, a Filipino womens’ advocacy organization, lambasted Aquino’s SONA for its lack of substance.

    “We want to call down what the President says is the State of the Nation Address. We think this is nothing but a series of empty boasts and lies. He should take his responsibilities as the President seriously and fix the economy.”

    Under the watch of President Aquino, the number of unemployed and underemployed has ballooned from 10.9 million in 2010 to 11.7 million in 2012, or roughly 12% of the total population. This, in contrast with the unprecedented growth in the net worth of the 40 richest Filipinos from $23 billion to $47 billion in the same period, has vast sectors of the Filipino working and peasant classes ready to incite open protest against the current administration. Thousands of demonstrators were expected to take to the streets on July 23 to protest against the 2012 SONA.

    Monico Florentino, a demonstrator, approached people waiting idly for their buses and engaged them in friendly conversation about the state of the Philippine economy.

    “I’m here at the parkette in support of these organizations to bring to attention the plight of overseas Filipino workers who won’t be mentioned in the State of the Nation Address by President Aquino,” said Florentino, who is a former Philippine government employee.

    Over 4,500 Filipinos join the global diaspora every day, fanning out across the globe on mournful journeys to send remittances home to their waiting families. 30% to 40% of Filipinos rely on remittances to stay afloat in the Southeast Asian republic, in dire conditions compounded by the recent global economic crisis. Soaring prices of food, fuel, and post-secondary tuition have the average Filipino family on the ropes. The minimum wage in the National Capital Region is PHP426, or roughly $10. The actual cost of living for the average family of six, however, is PHP1,008 - 54% more than what minimum wage earners take home. One-third of the population lives on less than $1.25 per day.

    Demonstrators bravely withstood the full onslaught of the summer sun and stifling humidity to impart their perspectives to their fellow kababayans. Alex Felipe, an organizer with Bayan Canada, an alliance of progressive, anti-imperialist Filipino organizations, went on a tirade against the injustices perpetrated by the Aquino administration.

    “The true state of the nation is that we remain a nation for the benefit of local elites and their foreign masters – a state we cannot stand to live with. We demand that Noynoy stop playing rhetorical games with the truth!”

    Under Aquino’s Oplan Bayanihan, over 90 government critics and activists have been murdered. 107 of the 385 current political prisoners have been arrested under his watch. On October 12, 2011, Aquino ratified new policy allowing mining companies to create and operate private militias, putting indigenous communities and human rights defenders at greater risk. Many, if not all, suspects in extrajudicial killings and disappearances are also elements of the country’s armed forces and national police force.

    For their part, the youth contingent, represented by Yshmael Cabana of Anakbayan Toronto, focused their criticism on the current administration’s failure to provide livelihoods for the nation’s young people.

    “Never has there been a government so callous in glorifying their programs of neoliberal globalization even though there is overwhelming evidence to show that these policies are destroying the education, employment, and culture of the youth,” Cabana said in his address.

    In a nation where 35% of the population is under the age of 14, prospects for young people remain as dismal as they were upon President Aquino’s inauguration. 50% of children aged 11 to 15 are out of school, many working in physically demanding and dangerous conditions for a pittance in order to support their families. Noynoy’s K to 12 education reform, an extension of two years for the current primary and secondary public school systems, has been touted as an initiative that would give Filipinos an edge in the competitive global labour market. However, due to a severe lack of funding and investment in relevant infrastructure, this has largely fallen flat. Classroom overcrowding and a shortage of teachers have instead posed health and logistical challenges which the government has treated with its characteristic apathy.

    The energy with which the demonstrators carried out the rally seemed at odds with the lazy hubbub of a sunny summer afternoon. Traffic crawled noisily by throughout the event, with several motorists honking their horns in support of the demonstrators or in irritation at drivers taken in by the spectacle – it was often hard to tell. As the rally drew to a close, supporters withdrew to the shady recesses of the parkette, settling in for a group discussion to expound on the virtues of progressive Philippine activism. Several curious individuals were initiated into the proceedings.

    All who were present eagerly awaited the People’s SONA, a massive grassroots protest in the Philippines timed to coincide with President Aquino’s own address. Their fervent hope was that Filipinos living in Canada would lend their voices to the growing peoples’ opposition to the Aquino administration, both in the Philippines and abroad.

    Jonathan Canchela of Migrante Partylist Canada put it succinctly.

    “Many of our countrymen and women experience severe hardship, many don’t have jobs, and the cost of living is too high – this is the reality.”

    Written by Dylan Hamada

    Photos courtesy of Marco and Lyla Luciano

    • 2 years ago
    • 5

    BAYAN-Canada Statement on PNoy’s “SONA” Lies

    anakbayan-toronto:

    July 2012

    I know and feel the problems of ordinary citizens. We all know what it is like to have a government that plays deaf and dumb. We know what it is like to be denied justice, to be ignored by those in whom we placed our trust and tasked to become our advocates.

    Have you ever been ignored by the very government you helped put in power?

    Have you had to endure being rudely shoved aside by the siren-blaring escorts of those who love to display their position and power over you?

    Have you experienced exasperation and anger at a government that instead of serving you, needs to be endured by you?

     These are the very own words of President Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino III at his inauguration address in 2010.

    These are also the very own words of someone who clearly doesn’t understand what those words mean.

    Today is the 23rd of July 2012 in the Philippines.  Today he will deliver his State of the Nation Address (SONA).  And today he will again spout words from mouth without any clear link to reality.

    The Philippine government today speaks proudly of the ‘record breaking performances’ of its stock market and GDP growth rate.  It is here that we should pause.  Because it doesn’t require any fancy economics degrees to realize that the true economy, the economy of the everyday, the economy that reflects the true ability of everyday people to eat well, have access to healthcare and education, to decent and fulfilling work, and most of all, to a good quality of life—well that economy very clearly is getting worse, much worse.

    Read More

    • 2 years ago
    • 6